Free Steam keys for I Shall Remain, Gravi, KRUNCH, iOS keys for Brain Guzzler

FreekeyFridaysWeek64.jpgIndieGames and FreekeyFridays bring you another set of free indie games. Freekeyfridays was created as a way to garner exposure for indies through giving away a mix of well-known indie games and up-and-coming titles.

Happy Halloween! This week's games are Brain Guzzler (iOS), I Shall Remain, (Steam, Windows) KRUNCH, (Steam, Windows) and Gravi (Steam, Windows).

There are two ways to win this week. Five sets of codes will be given for the raffle. Enter here: Three sets of codes will be given for this Twitter contest : Send us pics of your Halloween costume. Follow @Freekeyfridays and #FKF64 with response for a chance to win.

Flaming Pumpkin

I Shall Remain

KRUNCH

Gravi


If you are a developer with an awesome game and want to be involved with Freekeyfridays, fill out this Form.

Free Steam keys for I Shall Remain, Gravi, KRUNCH, iOS keys for Brain Guzzler

FreekeyFridaysWeek64.jpgIndieGames and FreekeyFridays bring you another set of free indie games. Freekeyfridays was created as a way to garner exposure for indies through giving away a mix of well-known indie games and up-and-coming titles.

Happy Halloween! This week's games are Brain Guzzler (iOS), I Shall Remain, (Steam, Windows) KRUNCH, (Steam, Windows) and Gravi (Steam, Windows).

There are two ways to win this week. Five sets of codes will be given for the raffle. Enter here: Three sets of codes will be given for this Twitter contest : Send us pics of your Halloween costume. Follow @Freekeyfridays and #FKF64 with response for a chance to win.

Flaming Pumpkin

I Shall Remain

KRUNCH

Gravi


If you are a developer with an awesome game and want to be involved with Freekeyfridays, fill out this Form.

Death’s Gambit looking a little like a 2D Shadow of the Colossus right now

deathsgambit_1gif.gif

The old saying about a picture being worth a thousand words is often times true. And with Death's Gambit, about all we have to go on is a few pictures. Now, I could waste your time and write a thousand-plus words, or I could put the pictures up and let you judge for yourself.

All we know for certain right now is that it's an action-RPG, enemies range from beasts to knights to horrors and can be huge, and that a Kickstarter is coming at some point in the future. Updates are sure to appear on the official website.

Thumbnail image for deathsgambit2gif.gif

Odallus: The Dark Call pre-orders are open

odallus.pngThe stunning graphics of Odallus: The Dark Call depicting a savage world forsaken by its gods are not just beautiful. They ensured its success on IndieGogo while conveying the epic atmosphere any fantasy, action exploration game needs. Having played through the latest beta of the game though, I can assure you Odallus is not a game that merely looks good in its NES-inspired attire. It's a rich and complex game instead. A game you'll love exploring and whose hurdles you'll love overcoming; mostly using a big sword.

Happily the game is almost done and pre-orders for Windows are already open; pre-ordering will grant you access to game's latest beta too. Oh, and you can still find its old demo here (direct download).

Preview: MegaCity sequel Concrete Jungle adds deck building to city building

cj_gif1.gifMegaCity, originally released in 2011 and given an HD remake last year, was a city builder which took micromanagement out of the equation in favor of focusing on planning layouts. Now it's getting a sequel for Windows and Mac with graphics inspired by classic 90s city building games and the addition of deck building mechanics that add a lot of depth to the game.

Concrete Jungle plays very much like its predecessor. As in MegaCity, the goal is to clear the left-most column of the grid by scoring a target number of population points in that column. Population points are obtained by placing a combination of shopping, industrial, community, and recreational buildings to build up the point values of tiles and placing residential buildings on those higher-point tiles. Some buildings lower the point values of nearby tiles, though, which makes strategic placement necessary to be able to continue the game as clearing columns gradually becomes more difficult. Clearing columns is the only way to open up more space to place new buildings.

New to the series, however, is its deck building aspects. Every building is represented by a card in the queue, and every card has two point values in the upper right-hand corner. The blue value is economy points; the more of those amassed, the more cards the player can add to their deck when a deck building phase hits. The red value is an advancement cost. Accruing advancement costs is what causes the point value needed to clear columns to go up. Every so often, a deck building phase occurs. For every card buy earned via economy points, the player is allowed to draft a card into their deck. The cards that can be added to the deck have a much wider range of capabilities than the starting cards, and as with any good deck building game, synergy is necessary for success.

Players familiar with the first game will be very comfortable with how Concrete Jungle plays, though I don't mean to say that newcomers will be lost. The strategy involved in building placement is very similar, especially early in the game before the deck building aspect heats up and a large variety of new buildings become available.

Even in its current prototypical state, Concrete Jungle is hard to put down. Fans of MegaCity should definitely look forward to it. For anyone else, MegaCity HD is available on a variety of platforms including free on Kongregate and can serve as a taste of what to expect from Concrete Jungle.

Concrete Jungle itself is headed to Windows and Mac computers with an anticipated release date of May 2015. A Kickstarter for Concrete Jungle went live a few days ago and has already made its £3,000 funding goal. Developer ColePowered Games is also running a Greenlight campaign.

[ColePowered Games]

Preview: MegaCity sequel Concrete Jungle adds deck building to city building

cj_gif1.gifMegaCity, originally released in 2011 and given an HD remake last year, was a city builder which took micromanagement out of the equation in favor of focusing on planning layouts. Now it's getting a sequel for Windows and Mac with graphics inspired by classic 90s city building games and the addition of deck building mechanics that add a lot of depth to the game.

Concrete Jungle plays very much like its predecessor. As in MegaCity, the goal is to clear the left-most column of the grid by scoring a target number of population points in that column. Population points are obtained by placing a combination of shopping, industrial, community, and recreational buildings to build up the point values of tiles and placing residential buildings on those higher-point tiles. Some buildings lower the point values of nearby tiles, though, which makes strategic placement necessary to be able to continue the game as clearing columns gradually becomes more difficult. Clearing columns is the only way to open up more space to place new buildings.

New to the series, however, is its deck building aspects. Every building is represented by a card in the queue, and every card has two point values in the upper right-hand corner. The blue value is economy points; the more of those amassed, the more cards the player can add to their deck when a deck building phase hits. The red value is an advancement cost. Accruing advancement costs is what causes the point value needed to clear columns to go up. Every so often, a deck building phase occurs. For every card buy earned via economy points, the player is allowed to draft a card into their deck. The cards that can be added to the deck have a much wider range of capabilities than the starting cards, and as with any good deck building game, synergy is necessary for success.

Players familiar with the first game will be very comfortable with how Concrete Jungle plays, though I don't mean to say that newcomers will be lost. The strategy involved in building placement is very similar, especially early in the game before the deck building aspect heats up and a large variety of new buildings become available.

Even in its current prototypical state, Concrete Jungle is hard to put down. Fans of MegaCity should definitely look forward to it. For anyone else, MegaCity HD is available on a variety of platforms including free on Kongregate and can serve as a taste of what to expect from Concrete Jungle.

Concrete Jungle itself is headed to Windows and Mac computers with an anticipated release date of May 2015. A Kickstarter for Concrete Jungle went live a few days ago and has already made its £3,000 funding goal. Developer ColePowered Games is also running a Greenlight campaign.

[ColePowered Games]

This War of Mine has a new trailer, showing off more of its stark visuals and narrative

Two trailers came out today for two different war games. I was first linked off to the one for Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, which contained everything you might imagine. Buff guys. Power fantasy. Cool tech. Dazzling explosions.

The next trailer was for a game of a more somber nature, a game about the people caught in the aftermath of those explosions, left in the wake of soldiers with cool tech, none of which seem that cool anymore.

This War of Mine has been called the war game that video games need. The existence of This War of Mine does not negate the existence of Call of Duty, but it is cool to see the unexplored side of an otherwise heavily overused subject in games, and to see it handled so gracefully.

Take its use of stylistic cross-sectioning, for instance, the way the game's structures offer a glimpse into every room in one, wide shot, each space unique in its state of dilapidation, filled with people suffering in their own ways.

"In war, not everyone is a soldier," states the game's website. This War of Mine is about war, centered on the folks not fighting it.

Of course, this is judging by its visuals. How will The War of Mine actually play?

According to its Steam page, we'll find out soon. The War of Mine will launch on PC, Mac, and Linux on November 14th.

Twitchy Thrones now available, free for limited time

twitchythrones.pngOnce a Bird's Twitchy Thrones is a simple RTS game in which the goal is to control all the capture points on the map. The player's only input to the game is to chose which groups of troops to move where. Move troops to a location in which you already have some and they will combine into a larger force. Move them to a location with enemies present and the two forces will duke it out with the last side standing taking control. It starts easy enough, but it isn't long before the game starts requiring the player to consider their moves carefully, yet quickly. Every ten seconds, more troops spawn, and in the game of Twitchy Thrones, you move or you die.

If you saw what I did there, you're well prepared for the Game of Thrones parody story in which the game is wrapped. It's not much of a story, just something to help frame the campaign that takes the player across a continent to wage war against other factions. The Up Lands area in which the player starts is the frosty tutorial zone; upon entering the Middle Lands, the game maps start including multiple opponents who will fight each other as happily as they will the player. That's also where the paths between capture points within a level start to fork a lot more. With fewer choke points to control, one wrong move will leave a hole that the AI is all too happy to exploit.

The game just came out on iPhone, and although it doesn't have native iPad support, it plays better in the upscaled mode the iPad has than do many other iPhone games I could name. It's free until November 5th, at which time the price will rise to $1.99.